Pistorious – A movie in the making

Money can buy the best legal & PR team in South Africa, but buying blood thirsty and fame driven criminals is another matter.  Might be best to talk to “The General” of the Numbers Gang.

Watch Ross Kemp

Or the story in the Metro

One of the most dangerous prisoners in South Africa has vowed to ‘take out’ Oscar Pistorius is he is sent to prison.

‘The General’, who is the leader of the notorious Numbers gang, said the paralympian must pay for ‘what he has done’.

Despite being a convicted murderer himself, the General, whose real name is John Mongrel, said he wished to make an example of wealthy South African prisoners who can buy protection.

Speaking to South African paper The Citizen, he said: ‘Anyone who thinks they can come here and live like a king, will have a hit on their head.

‘If he thinks he is going to come here and buy his way to get computers and cellphones and a lavish lifestyle, he must know that will never happen for as long as I am around.’

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Gender based violence #femicide. Protector and perpetrator – A male preserve

Reeva SteenkampLet REEVA STEENKAMP’S name never be forgotten, because she was a stalwart spokesperson for Women’s rights and VAW (Violence Against Women)

Femicide is the ultimate form of violence against women and girls and takes multiple forms. Its many causes are rooted in the historically unequal power relations between men and women and in systemic gender – based discrimination.  For a case to be considered femicide there must be an implied intention to carry out the murder and a demonstrated connection between the crime and the female gender of the victim.

So far, data on femicide have been highly unreliable and the estimated numbers of women who have been victims of femicides vary accordingly.
Femicides take place in every country of the world. The greatest concern related to femicide is that these murders continue to be accepted, tolerated or justified – with impunity as the norm. To end femicide we need to end impunity, bring perpetrators to justice, and every individual has to change his/her attitude towards women [SOURCE is a long PDF but #mustread]

 

Gender-based violence against women is a global phenomenon with appalling incidence everywhere. In 2013 WHO, along with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Medical Research Council, analysed existing data from 80 countries and found that an alarming 35% of women experienced gender-based violence. 30% of women experienced physical and/or sexual violence at the hands of their partner and 38% of murders of women were committed by intimate partners. These statistics do not take account of unreported incidence, nor of the damaging non-physical or non-sexual violence which many women experience [SOURCE]

 

#ChildAbuse Samantha Morton speaks

Chils abuse samantha morton

Actress Samantha Morton tells of childhood sexual abuse

“I just wanted to go public with this, to say, we know it’s rife but why are there not further investigations into other areas? It isn’t just Rotherham, I’m sure it’s not just Rotherham,” said Morton.[Source]

Actress Samantha Morton has said she was sexually abused by two residential care workers while in a children’s home in Nottingham as a teenager.

Ms Morton said she reported the abuse to authorities in the 1990s but said the men had not been investigated.

She told the Guardian she had spoken out after revelations of abuse in Rotherham and amid an inquiry into allegations of abuse in Nottingham.

Nottinghamshire Police said it had no record of a complaint by Ms Morton.

The Bafta and Golden Globe winning actress, 37, has twice been nominated for an Oscar, for Sweet and Lowdown in 2000 and In America in 2004. She spent much of her childhood in care homes in Nottingham.

She told the newspaper she had been abused at the Red Tiles home, in Bulwell, Nottingham – one of 13 children’s homes being investigated by Nottinghamshire County Council following allegations of historical abuse.

Ms Morton said she was 13 when she had reported the abuse, but said “there was no support, no offer of counselling, no wanting to delve deeper”.

“Maybe they just assumed I had been abused already, or was being, anyway. A lot of people who abused my friends were people in very, very top jobs within the social services.

“Nottingham in the 80s was rife with that,” she added.

Image and article [original source] BBC

Arab “men hate women”? @MonaEltahaway

“Why do they hate us?”

With these five words in a controversial magazine article, Egyptian-American journalist Mona Eltahawy shot to fame, unleashing a devastating critique of women’s rights in the Arab world.

In the season premiere of Head to Head , Mehdi Hasan challenges Eltahawy on her views regarding the status of women in Arab states.

Are Arab or Muslim societies inherently patriarchal? And how does the narrative of Islam as sexist play into geo-politics and Western stereotypes of the Middle East?

Joining the discussion is Dr Aitemad Muhanna of the London School of Economics’ Middle East Centre; self-proclaimed progressive Imam Dr Taj Hargey; and Dr Shuruq Naguib, a British-Egyptian academic from Lancaster University.

 

Some of the concepts & issues explored by Mona in this video

 

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British help for oppression in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain

Dear Kitty. Some blog

Demonstrators protesting against a G8 summit being held in Northern Ireland, walk to BAE systems headquarters in central London, 12 June 2013. Photo: REUTERS/Olivia Harris

From Index on Censorship:

Revealed: The British exports that crush free expression

9 May 2014

The Arab Spring has not stopped Britain from helping crush free expression and freedom of assembly by selling crowd control gear to authoritarian states including Saudi Arabia and Bahrain.

Analysis of newly-published data on export licences approved by the UK government have revealed ministers backed over £4 million of tear gas, crowd control ammunition and CS hand grenade sales over the last two years to Saudi Arabiaone of the most repressive states in the world.

The British government also allowed crowd control ammunition to be sold to Malaysia and Oman, as well as tear gas to Hong Kong and Thailand.

It gave the green light to anti-riot and ballistic shields to four authoritarian regimes listed by the Economist Democratic Index: the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Azerbaijan

View original post 762 more words

#BringBackOurGirls NYT

NYT BringBackOurGirls

by Nicholas Kristof

DOZENS of heavily armed terrorists rolled into the sleepy little town one night in a convoy of trucks, buses and vans. They made their way to the girls’ boarding school.

The high school girls, asleep in their dormitory, awoke to gunfire. The attackers stormed the school, set it on fire, and, residents said, then herded several hundred terrified girls into the vehicles — and drove off and vanished.

That was April 15 in northern Nigeria. The girls were kidnapped by an extremist Muslim group called Boko Haram, whose name in the Hausa language means “Western education is a sin.

These girls, ages 15 to 18 and Christians and Muslims alike, knew the risks of seeking an education, and schools in the area had closed in March for fear of terror attacks. But this school had reopened so that the girls — the stars of their families and villages — could take their final exams. They were expected to move on to become teachers, doctors, lawyers.

Instead, they reportedly are being auctioned off for $12 each to become “wives” of militants. About 50 girls escaped, but the police say that 276 are still missing — and the Nigerian government has done next to nothing to recover the girls.

Read the full article here

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Girls not Brides

 

GirlsNotBrides-LogoChild marriage could become law in Iraq this week, but it’s a global scourge
My organisation is fighting to secure the right of every child to be at school. It’s the only way to stop this barbaric practice
By

Gordon Brown
The Guardian, Tuesday 29 April 2014

Girl brides

When Iraqi voters go to the polls tomorrow they are likely to endorse parties that plan to legalise child marriage at nine years old. Based on Shia Islamic jurisprudence, what is called the Ja’afari personal status law was approved by the current Iraqi cabinet eight weeks ago. It describes girls as reaching puberty at nine, and therefore ready for marriage. The current legal age is 18…….

The facts are that the one secure way to prevent child marriage is to deliver the right of every child to be at school. A girl with some education is not only unlikely to be married at eight, nine or 10, but is also six times less likely to be married by 18.

Child marriage-free zones, where girls get together and refuse to be married, are springing up on the subcontinent – the first in Pakistan, with several now in Bangladesh, and others soon to be set up in countries such as Malawi. We see that girls are no longer prepared to succumb to the fate that others have decided for them, or to wait for others to protect them.

Together with a group of high profile individuals I am proud to be part of the Emergency Coalition for Education Action. The coalition is committed to zero education exclusion, and this means zero child marriage. We are linking up with girls’ rights movements across the developing world, including Nepal’s Common Forum for Kalmal Hari Freedom, the Nilphamari Child Marriage Free Zone in Bangladesh, the Ugandan Child Protection Club, and Indonesia’s Grobogan Child Empowerment Group.

Many are linked to the growing Girls not Brides movement spearheaded by Princess Mabel van Oranje of the Netherlands – more than 300 national organisations are already affiliated. They are attempting to stop child marriage by law, to register girls by their correct ages, to enforce existing banning regulations, and to get girls to school.

Children’s rights must be protected across the world, and we call on all countries to put an end to the barbaric practice of child marriage and to ensure all children are in school and learning.

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